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Sequoyah George Gist\Guess

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Birth  1760  Cherokee Nation - Fort Louden, TN 
Sex  Male 
Died  1842  Mexico 
Person ID  I11420  Default Tree 
Last Modified  03 Feb 2006 
 
Family 1  Uckteeyah Langley, b. Abt 1810 
Children 
 1. Ee-Yah-Gu Gist\Guess, b. Abt 1830
 2. Oo-Loo-Tsa Gist\Guess, b. Abt 1832
 3. Gu-U-Ne-Ki Gist\Guess, b. Abt 1834
Group Sheet  F4205  Default Tree 
 
Family 2  UTiYu (Gist\Guess) 
Group Sheet  F4206  Default Tree 
 
Notes 
  • AKA: Sequoya, Sikwoyi
    "Near the town of Tanasee, and not far from the almost mythical town o f Chote lies Taskigi (Tuskeegee), home of Sequoyah. In this peaceful valley setting Wut-teh, the daughter of a Cherokee Chief (Chief Great Eagle), married Nathaniel Gist, a Virginia fur trader. The warrior Sequoyah was born of this union in 1776. Probably born handicapped, and thus the name Sequoyah( Sikwo-yi is Cherokee for "pig's foot"), Sequoyah fled Tennessee as a youth because of the encroachment of whites. He initially moved to Georgia, where he acquired skills working with silver. While in the state, a man who purchased one of his works suggested that he sign his work, like the white silversmiths had begun to do. Sequoyah considered the idea and since he did not know how to write he visited Charles Hicks, a wealthy farmer in the area who wrote English. Hicks showed Sequoyah how to spell his name, writing the letters on a piece of paper. Sequoyah began to toy with the idea of a Cherokee writing system that year (1809).
    He moved to Willstown, AL, and enlisted in the Cherokee Regiment, fighting in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, which effectively ended the war against the Creek Redsticks. During the war, he became convinced of the necessity of literacy for his people. He and other Cherokees were unable to write letters home, read military orders, or record events as they occurred. After the war, he began in earnest to create a writing system.
    Using a phonetic system, where each sound made in speech was represented by a symbol, he created "Talking Leaves", 85 letters that make up the Cherokee alphabet. His little girl Ayoka easily learned this method of communication. He demonstrated his syllabary to his cousin, George Lowrey, who was impressed. A short time later in a Cherokee Court in Chattooga, he read an argument about a boundary line from a sheet of paper. Word spread quickly of Sequoyah's invention. In 1821, 12 years after the original idea, the Cherokee Nation adopted Sequoyah's alphabet as their own. Within months thousands of Cherokee became literate.
    The crippled warrior moved west to Arkansas. Mining and selling saltf or money he was active in politics. In 1824 the National Council at New Echota struck a silver medal in his honor. Later, publication began on the first Native American newspaper, The Cherokee Phoenix in the same town. The painting of Sequoyah was made in 1828 on a trip to Washington to negotiate terms for removal from Arkansas to Oklahoma. Leaving the state in 1829, he had lived in Oklahoma for 10 years when Principal
    Chief John Ross led North Georgia Cherokee on the "Trail of Tears" to the state.
    He died in Mexico (now Texas) in 1843 after possibly visiting family in a band of Chickamauga Cherokee who had moved there earlier. Perhaps the most eloquent praise paid to Sequoyah was by H. A. Scomp, member of Emory College faculty, when he said "...perhaps the most remarkable man who has ever lived on Georgia soil was neither a politician, nor a soldier, nor an ecclesiastic, nor a scholar, but merely a Cherokee Indian of mixed blood. And strange to say, this Indian acquired permanent fame, neither expecting or seeking it."
    Below is another article from North Georgia site :
    Realizing a key to development of the Cherokee Nation was a written language, Sequoyah began work on a graphic representation of the Cherokee language. The syllabary, officially listed as being completed in 1821, took 12 years to create. Sequoyah came up with the idea of "Talking Leaves" when he visited Chief Charles Hicks, who showed him how to write his name so he could sign his work like American silversmiths had begun to do.
    Initially, Sequoyah tried pictographs, but soon discovered that the num ber of symbols in the Cherokee language would be in the thousands. Then he began to create symbols for each syllable the Cherokees use. This was the essential step in creating the syllabary. Sequoyah's written language was not the first example of the concept. A Japanese syllabary was developed from 5th century A. D. Chinese ideographic writing. The concept of an alphabet, which denotes sounds instead of syllables, originated in Phoenicia.
    His work was interupted by the Creek War of 1813/1814, when he joined a Cherokee force under the leadership of The Ridge. After the war, Major Ridge would be called on as leader of the Lighthorse Patrol to punish to Sequoyah for trying to create the syllabary. The leaders of the tribe felt that this written language was the work of the devil, and to force him to stop they ordered Ridge to remove the tops of his fingers.
    Although he lacked a formal education he spoke several languages fluently. Returning to the Lower Towns, he continued his work while he was caught up in the Creek Path Conspiracy. His syllabary originally contained 115 characters, but he reduced this number to 83 before its first publication. Later, three additional sounds were added bringing the number up to 86. Disenchanted with the movement towards nationalism, Sequoyah left Georgia in 1821 and moved to Arkansas, arriving in 1822. He was living here when the syllabary was introduced to the Cherokee Nation. In a few short years one man had acheived a means of communication that had taken other civilizations thousands of years to accomplish.
    Use of the language spread quickly through the Chreokee Nation. Anyone w ho could speak the Cherokee language could learn to read or write in two weeks. Thousands of Cherokee began to use Sequoyah's invention on a daily basis and the syllabary gave the nation the ability to create the first American Indian newspaper, The Cherokee Phoenix The name "Talking Leaves" was satirical of whites. The Cherokee felt that white man's words dried up and blew away like leaves when the words no longer suited the whites. "
    [2779023 From Adam to Me.FTW]
    "Near the town of Tanasee, and not far from the almost mythical townofC hote lies Taskigi (Tuskeegee), home of Sequoyah. In this peacefulvalleysetting Wut-teh, the daughter of a Cherokee Chief (Chief Great Eagle) ,married Nathaniel Gist, a Virginia fur trader. The warrior Sequoyah wasborn of this union in 1776. Probably born handicapped, and thusthe name Sequoyah (Sik w o-yi is Cherokee for "pig's foot"), Sequoyah fled Tennesseeas a youth because of the encroachment of whites. He initially moved toGeorgia, where he acquired skills working with silver. While in the state, a man who purchased one of his works suggested that he sign his work, like the white silversmiths had begun to do. Sequoyah considered the idea and since he did not know how to write he visited Charles Hicks, a wealthy farmer in the area who wrote English. Hicks showed Sequoyah how to spell his name, writing the letters on a piece of paper. Sequoyah began to toy with the idea of a Cherokee writing systemthat year( 1809).
    He moved to Willstown, AL, and enlisted in the Cherokee Regiment, fighting in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, which effectively ended the war against the Creek Redsticks. During the war, he became convinced of the necessity of literacy for his people. He and other Cherokees were unable to write letters home, read military orders, orrecord events as they occurred . After the war, he began in earnest toc reate a writing system.
    Using a phonetic system, where each sound made in speech was represented by a symbol, he created "Talking Leaves", 85 letters thatmake up the Cherokee alphabet. His little girl Ayoka easily learned this method of communication. He demonstrated his syllabary to his cousin,George Lowrey, who was impressed. A short time later in a Cherokee Co., Chattooga, he read an argument about a boundary line from a sheet of paper. Word spread quickly of Sequoyah's invention. In 1821, 12 years after the original idea, the Cherokee Nation adopted Sequoyah's alphabet as their own. Within months thousands of Cherokee became literate.
    The crippled warrior moved west to Arkansas. Mining and selling salt for money he was activ e in politics. In 1824 the National Council at New Echota struck a silver medal in his honor. Later, publication began on the 1st Native American newspaper, The Cherokee Phoenix in the same town. The painting of Sequoyah was made in 1828 on a trip to Washington to negotiate terms for removal from Arkansas to Oklahoma. Leaving thestate in 1829, he had lived in Oklahoma for 10 years when Principal Chief John Ross led North Georgia Cherokee on the "Trail of Tears" to the state.
    He died in Mexico (now Texas) in 1843 after possibly visiting family in band of Chickamauga Cherokee who had moved there earlier. Perhaps the most eloquent praise paid to Sequoyah was by H. A. Scomp, member of Emory College faculty, when he said "...perhaps the most remarkable man who hasever lived on Georgia soil was neither a politician, nor a soldier, nor an ecclesiastic, nor a scholar, but merely a Cherokee Indian of mixed blood. And strange to say, this Indian acquired permanent fame,neithe rexpecting or seeking it."
    Below is another article from N. Georgia site
    Realizing a key to development of the Cherokee Nation was a written language, Sequoyah began work on a graphic representation of theCherokee language. The syllabary, officially listed as being completed in 1821,took 12 years to create. Sequoyah came up with the idea of "Talking Leaves" when he visited Chief Charles Hicks, who showed him how to write his name so he could sign his work like American silversmiths had begun to do.
    Initially, Sequoyah tried pictographs, but soon discovered that the number of symbols in the Cherokee language would be in the thousands.Then he began to create symbols for each syllable the Cherokees use. This was the essential step in creating the syllabary. Sequoyah's written language was not the 1st example of the concept. A Japanese syllabary was developed from 5th century A. D. Chinese ideographic writing. The concept of an alphabet, which denotes sounds instead of syllables, originated in Phoenicia.
    His work was interupted by the Creek War of 1813-1814, when he joined a Cherokee force under the leadership of The Ridge. After the war, Major Ridge would be called on as leader of the Lighthorse Patrol to punish to Sequoyah for trying to create the syllabary. The leaders of the tribe felt that this written language was the work of the devil, and to force him to stop -- they ordered Ridge to remove the tops of his fingers.
    Although he lacked a formal education he spoke several language sfluently. Returning to the Lower Towns, he continued his work while he was caught up in the Creek Path Conspiracy. His syllabary originally contained 115characters, but he reduced this number to 83 before its 1st publication. Later, three additional sounds were added bringing the number up to 86. Disenchanted with the movement towards nationalism, Sequoyah left Georgia in 1821 and moved to Arkansas, arriving in 1822. He was living here when the syllabary was introduced to the Cherokee Nation. In a few short years one man had acheived a means of communication that had taken other civilizations thousands of years to accomplish.
    Use of the language spread quickly through the Chreokee Nation. Anyone who could speak the Cherokee language could learn to read or write in two weeks. Thousands of Cherokee began to use Sequoyah's invention on a daily basis and the syllabary gave the nation the ability to create the firstAmerican Indian newspaper, The Cherokee Phoenix The name "Talking Leaves" was satirical of whites. The Cherokee felt that whiteman's words dried up and blew away like leaves whe n the words no longer suited the whites. "
    Marriage:
    Family of Sequoya
    SEQUOYA was the son of WURTEH WATTS (third generation Red Paint Clan Mother) and NATHANIEL GIST. He was the grandson of SISTER OF DOUBLEHEAD (WURTEH, second generation Red Paint Clan Mother) and JOHN WATTS, and possibly the nephew of TOTSUHWA (RED BIRD). SEQUOYA was the great-grandson of WILENAWA and WURTEH (first generation Red Paint Clan Mother), 2nd great-grandson of MOYTOY and a WILD POTATO CLAN MOTHER, and 3rd great-grandson of AMADOYA MOYTOY and QUEDSI. The siblings of SEQUOYA include AHULUDEGI (JOHN JOLLY), TALONVTISGI BENGE, UTANA BENGE, GANVHIDV GASGILO BENGE (ROBERT BENGE), LUCY BENGE, JOSEPH (?) BENGE, and RICHARD BENGE.
    Source:
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~brockfamily/KinshipNotes-KBTankersley.html
 
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